Kids

KIDS
04.16.14

Efforts to stop school violence hurt by lack of money

Mental-health professionals in Pennsylvania schools, for instance, say funding cuts in recent years have prompted reductions in school counselors, social workers and psychologists.

KIDS
04.15.14

Little users become the next big thing for tablets

In the U.S., the percentage of kids ages 8 and under using mobile devices has doubled in the past two years. And they're spending more time on the tablets too.

KIDS
04.14.14

Fleeing Fukushima: Attending school far away

The 2011 tsunami disaster destroyed the Fukushima nuclear plant. Because radiation is still leaking, a town 200 miles away has offered to take in students.

KIDS
04.14.14

Schools look for ways to stop students from tossing their lunches

Nationally, the cost of wasted food in schools — including milk, meats and grains — is estimated at more than $1 billion a year.

KIDS
04.11.14

Lupita's look, a short Afro, becomes a standard of beauty

Academy Award winning actress Lupita Nyong'o wears her hair in an extra-short Afro style. She's helped broaden what is considered to be beautiful hair.

KIDS
04.09.14

Once unhip instrument is now cool, accordion to Weird Al

The accordion, with its unique sound, is making a big comeback. Part of it has to do with the trend of rediscovering weird things and making them cool.

KIDS
04.07.14

More children and teens crossing into U.S. unaccompanied

Fear of gang violence and hopes that the U.S. will change its immigration laws have driven more youths to make the risky journey across the U.S.-Mexico border.

KIDS
04.04.14

In school, popular kids get bullied just like the outcasts, study says

The study's surprising conclusion is that the more popular teens are, the more likely they are to get bullied, except for those at the very top of the high school social ladder.

KIDS
03.31.14

Finding a home for, and in, the LA Derby Dolls

Young women who compete in roller derby skate hard and get bumps and bruises. They walk away with a sense of achievement. Meanwhile, the team's looking for new headquarters.

KIDS
03.26.14

Black preschoolers more likely to get suspended, report says

A report by the Education Department says black students are disciplined more strictly, even in preschool.

KIDS
03.25.14

Homework: Too little or too much? It depends

"The homework horror stories have to be read in a proper perspective," says an education expert. He pointed out that the homework load has been pretty stable for 20 to 30 years.

KIDS
03.25.14

Millennials living at home are more savvy than some people think

“The refuge of home can be a lifeline, sometimes meaning the difference between barely getting by and falling over the edge into poverty,” one author wrote of the "Peter Pan" generation.

KIDS
03.18.14

San Antonio moves its library into the future, and leaves books behind

A new book-free library aims to help its patrons get better access to the latest technology with e-readers, computers and tablets.

KIDS
03.13.14

Marching to the beat of an uplifting drum

“This whole thing has to do with saving lives, not just marching in front of the cameras," said the leader of a drill team in one of the country's most dangerous cities.

KIDS
03.11.14

Girl Scouts' partnership with Barbie criticized after swimsuit issue

Sporting a sexy swimsuit in Sports Illustrated, Barbie embarked on her latest career. Consumer groups criticized the move, and the Girl Scouts' partnership with toy maker Mattel.

KIDS
03.07.14

SAT exam gets a makeover, essay and unusual vocabulary dropped

The SAT test will be condensed to two sections from the current three. There will be an optional essay section colleges may require students to take. The changes take effect in 2016.

KIDS
02.27.14

University aims to create college-going culture among kids

Western Washington University's program to get kids thinking about college has reached into 350 classrooms and touched the lives of about 9,000 young students.

KIDS
02.27.14

Program serves up squash to inner-city kids

SquashSmarts in Philadelphia is an after-school program. It is among 15 clubs nationwide using the game to help underprivileged students through physical fitness and tutoring.

KIDS
02.25.14

Copenhagen Zoo kills a giraffe, U.S. zoos say they don't do that

The Danish zoo killed the animal because it was not needed for breeding. Then its parts were fed to lions. Many question why Copenhagen did not send the giraffe to another zoo.

KIDS
02.20.14

Appeals court rules unconstitutional a Nevada school's uniform

The uniform shirt had the school motto "Tomorrow's Leaders." That violated the First Amendment right of free speech and not being forced to say something against one's will.

KIDS
02.19.14

More and more students suffer from anxiety

Educators say they are seeing a sharp rise in mental stresses among students that are leading to depression. The problem cuts across social class and income level.

KIDS
02.11.14

Russia crowns a new ice princess at Olympics

Julia Lipnitskaia of Russia became the youngest athlete to win a gold medal at the Winter Olympics. She clinched the team gold medal for Russia, its first.

KIDS
02.07.14

Parents angered by school tossing away children's $2 lunches

At an elementary school in Salt Lake City, the lunches of 40 students were thrown away because their parents were behind in payments to the lunch program.

KIDS
02.07.14

Fourth-graders have become better readers

But reading proficiency varied widely across the states. And the report found a growing gap in reading skills between children from lower-income and higher-income families.

KIDS
02.05.14

Obama vows to bring high-speed Internet to all U.S. schools

The president said U.S. students should have access to the Web to make them competitive with schoolchildren in countries like South Korea.

KIDS
02.05.14

Historian helps solve mystery of young girl in 1908 photos

He used the 1910 census from Lincolnton, N.C., and a face-recognition expert to track down her identity.

KIDS
01.31.14

Texas cuts algebra II from its high school equation

Supporters say the move gives more flexibility to school districts, which can still require the course. Critics accuse the state of dumbing-down its curriculum.